Committee
CCPCJ
Country
South Africa

Author

Regina Jorde
Germany

Cite as https://mymun.com/ppdb/18789

Conference: EuroMUN Maastricht 2019

Committee: Committee on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice

Country: Republic of South Africa

 

The topics in the Committee on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (CCPCJ) of the EuroMUN Maastricht 2019 conference are “Environmental Crime (with a Focus on Illegal Poaching and Trade with Endangered Species)” and “Combating the Challenges of Justice Systems (with a Focus on Restorative Justice)”.

 

Topic A: Environmental Crime (with a Focus on Illegal Poaching and Trade with Endangered Species)

Climate change and habitat loss are critical causes for the loss of biodiversity, yet illegal poaching and trade with endangered species are vital contributing factors as well. Due to high demand for exotic animals or parts of them, such as horns and ivory, as well as the lack of universalized justice systems regarding environmental crime, these issues remained problematic for centuries.

As a country with great biodiversity, poaching and trade with endangered species are problems South Africa already faces for many years. Especially elephants, as well as black and white rhinos are endangered in the country, since their horns are valuable and traded as trophies.[1] A lot of the trade with animals goes to Southeast Asia, where particular body parts of exotic animals are used for traditional medicine.[2] In contrast, imports of rhinos from Swaziland are generally used to improve stocking rates, according to the IUCN/SSC.

In order to combat the problems of environmental crime, various conventions have been put in place. These include inter alia the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS). These conventions established targets regarding the preservation of biodiversity and classified animals into different annexes with different regulations regarding the trade of these animals.[3]

South Africa is member to many of these treaties, such as the CITES convention, since the country is aiming at fighting the trade of endangered species.